Tank The Armoured Fighting Vehicle

Tank One of  War Machine

A tank is an armoured fighting vehicle designed for front-line combat, with heavy firepower, strong armour, and tracks providing good battlefield maneuverability.

The first tanks were designed to overcome the deadlock of trench warfare; now they are a mainstay of modern ground forces and a key part of combined arms combat.-justplay

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Modern tanks are versatile mobile land weapon system platforms, mounting a large-calibre cannon in a rotating gun turret, supplemented by mounted machine guns or other weapons.
They combine this with heavy vehicle armour which provides protection for the crew, the vehicle’s weapons, and its propulsion systems, and operational mobility, due to its use of tracks rather than wheels, which allows the tank to move over rugged terrain and be positioned on the battlefield in advantageous locations.
These features enable the tanks to perform well in a tactical situation: the combination of powerful weapons fire from their tank gun, and their ability to survive enemy fire means the tank can engage the enemy even under fire.
In both offensive and defensive roles, they are powerful units that are capable of performing tasks which are required of armoured units on the battlefield.
The modern tank was the result of a century of development from the first primitive armoured vehicles, due to improvements in technology such as the internal combustion engine, which allowed the rapid movement of heavy armoured vehicles.
As a result of these advances, tanks underwent tremendous shifts in capability in the years since their first appearance.

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Tanks in World War I were developed separately and simultaneously by Great Britain and France as a means to break the deadlock of trench warfare on the Western Front.

The initial vehicle, nicknamed Little Willie, was constructed at William Foster & Co. in Lincoln, England in 1915, with leading roles played by Major Walter Gordon Wilson who designed the gearbox and hull, and by William Tritton of William Foster and Co., who designed the track plates.
This was a prototype of a new design that would become the British Army’s Mark I tank, the first tank used in combat in September 1916 during the Battle of the Somme.
The name “tank” was adopted by the British during the early stages of their development, as a security measure to conceal their purpose (see etymology).
While the British and French built thousands of tanks in World War I, Germany was unconvinced of the tank’s potential, and built only twenty.

Tank

During the Cold War, the main battle tank concept arose and became a key component of modern armies.

In the 21st century, with the increasing role of asymmetrical warfare and the end of the Cold War, that also contributed to the increase of cost-effective Russian anti-tank weapons worldwide, the importance of tanks has waned.
Modern tanks seldom operate alone, as they are organized into combined arms units which involve the support of infantry, who may accompany the tanks in infantry fighting vehicles.
They are also usually supported by reconnaissance or ground-attack aircraft.

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